Farmstead Villa debuts apartments for seniors who want ‘just a bit of help’

Operations manager Tim Noteboom and family relations director Kayla Abele will conduct tours of the new Farmstead Villa 55-plus residence from 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. The 33-unit, three-story building at 3200 28th St. S. is adjacent to Farmstead Care and across the street from Farmstead Living. (Photo/Russ Hanson)

Nancy Edmonds Hanson
hansonnanc@gmail.com

The newest addition to the Farmstead Living retirement complex in southeast Moorhead “completes the loop,” as developer Roger Erickson describes it.
“This is the last missing piece in what we offer for people who are 55-plus,” he explains. “We started with completely independent living for older adults at Farmstead Estates. As our ads say, our independent apartments were ‘designed with my parents in mind.’ Now, years later, we’ve created the next step.” He adds with a smile, “You could say I built the Villa with myself in mind.”
Farmstead Villa bridges the gap between total independence and needing – or preferring – just a little bit of help. The three-story building’s 33 spacious apartments each boast two bedrooms and two baths. The 1,000-square-foot units include a large, well-equipped kitchen opening into a roomy living room. Each has its own washer and dryer. Large balconies or ground-floor patios offer a breath of fresh air looking out to the north or south.
That’s just the beginning. Facilities manager Tim Noteboom, who joined the Farmstead organization a year ago, says the Villa’s design has been shaped by the older adults who’ll live there. One high point is the garage that adjoins the building. “Knowing older drivers will be using it, it was laid out with a little more room and a lot more light,” he notes.
Kayla Abele, Farmstead’s director of family and community relations, says attention has been paid to residents’ social needs, too. Monthly rental fees all include daily lunches, afternoon snacks and dinners. “It’s not just about food and nutrition,” she explains. “Mealtime is an opportunity to get out and visit with others. That’s not easy for a lot of people who live alone.” She adds, “Some of our first residents have told me that they just don’t want to cook anymore.”
Residents who are also tired of housework have reason to rejoice, too. Light housekeeping services are provided as part of their fee.
The Villa’s game room is equipped with a pool table and table shuffleboard, as well as plenty of games. There’s exercise equipment, too, and a large communal patio facing east to catch a breath of air. A full schedule of chauffeured outings and activities is also in the works, from Redhawks games and dining out to weekly shopping excursions.
Opening the Villa marks completion of developer Erickson’s vision for a continuum of services for the Moorhead area’s aging population – a bridge between complete privacy and independence and the kind of watchful care many come to need as the years add up.
“As our census became older and needed additional services, Farmstead Care came about to give them options without needing to uproot themselves and move to a different facility,” Erickson recounts. Built in two phases – the latest opened earlier this year – the assisted living now offer a full menu of services that can be added based on residents’ changing needs, including memory care and accommodations for those in hospice care.
According to Noteboom, new residents moved into seven of the Villa’s 33 apartments as soon as the doors opened earlier this month; another four are expected by the first of September. When fully occupied, he expects the little community to total about 50 people.
Potential residents are welcome to tour the facility and learn about the services and activities it offers at open houses from 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 24, and Thursday, Aug. 26, as well as Sept. 3 and 5. Pie and coffee will be served in the main-floor dining area.



The newest addition to the Farmstead Living retirement complex in southeast Moorhead “completes the loop,” as developer Roger Erickson describes it.
“This is the last missing piece in what we offer for people who are 55-plus,” he explains. “We started with completely independent living for older adults at Farmstead Estates. As our ads say, our independent apartments were ‘designed with my parents in mind.’ Now, years later, we’ve created the next step.” He adds with a smile, “You could say I built the Villa with myself in mind.”
Farmstead Villa bridges the gap between total independence and needing – or preferring – just a little bit of help. The three-story building’s 33 spacious apartments each boast two bedrooms and two baths. The 1,000-square-foot units include a large, well-equipped kitchen opening into a roomy living room. Each has its own washer and dryer. Large balconies or ground-floor patios offer a breath of fresh air looking out to the north or south.
That’s just the beginning. Facilities manager Tim Noteboom, who joined the Farmstead organization a year ago, says the Villa’s design has been shaped by the older adults who’ll live there. One high point is the garage that adjoins the building. “Knowing older drivers will be using it, it was laid out with a little more room and a lot more light,” he notes.
Kayla Abele, Farmstead’s director of family and community relations, says attention has been paid to residents’ social needs, too. Monthly rental fees all include daily lunches, afternoon snacks and dinners. “It’s not just about food and nutrition,” she explains. “Mealtime is an opportunity to get out and visit with others. That’s not easy for a lot of people who live alone.” She adds, “Some of our first residents have told me that they just don’t want to cook anymore.”
Residents who are also tired of housework have reason to rejoice, too. Light housekeeping services are provided as part of their fee.
The Villa’s game room is equipped with a pool table and table shuffleboard, as well as plenty of games. There’s exercise equipment, too, and a large communal patio facing east to catch a breath of air. A full schedule of chauffeured outings and activities is also in the works, from Redhawks games and dining out to weekly shopping excursions.
Opening the Villa marks completion of developer Erickson’s vision for a continuum of services for the Moorhead area’s aging population – a bridge between complete privacy and independence and the kind of watchful care many come to need as the years add up.
“As our census became older and needed additional services, Farmstead Care came about to give them options without needing to uproot themselves and move to a different facility,” Erickson recounts. Built in two phases – the latest opened earlier this year – the assisted living now offer a full menu of services that can be added based on residents’ changing needs, including memory care and accommodations for those in hospice care.
According to Noteboom, new residents moved into seven of the Villa’s 33 apartments as soon as the doors opened earlier this month; another four are expected by the first of September. When fully occupied, he expects the little community to total about 50 people.
Potential residents are welcome to tour the facility and learn about the services and activities it offers at open houses from 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 24, and Thursday, Aug. 26, as well as Sept. 3 and 5. Pie and coffee will be served in the main-floor dining area.

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