area briefs

POST TRAUMATIC FUNK SYNDROME TO PLAY MOORHEAD PUBLIC LIBRARY CONCERT 

MOORHEAD – The public is invited to join the Moorhead Public Library for a free performance featuring Post Traumatic Funk Syndrome, a classic rock band which boasts a swinging horn section and some serious funk. On Thursday, June 23 at 7:00 p.m. the band will play a set of classic 60s’ and 70s’ hits in an unforgettable concert held outside the Moorhead Public Library. Audience members are encouraged to bring lawn chairs for seating. Admission is offered free-of-charge and the concert is open to the public.

Additional offerings for all ages will be available during the event, including activities hosted by the Rourke Art Museum and the Friends of the Moorhead Public Library. Local food trucks will be available. This event is made possible thanks to funding from the Minnesota Arts & Cultural Heritage Fund. The doors will open at 5:30 with the concert beginning at 7 p.m.

The library will host additional family-friendly concerts throughout the summer, featuring Moving Parts on July 28 and Meat Rabbits on August 25.

HCSCC WINS PRESTIGIOUS 2022 AASLH AWARD OF EXCELLENCE 

MOORHEAD – The Historical and Cultural Society of Clay County has received an American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) Award of Excellence for the Ihdago Manipi: Clay County at 150 exhibition now on display at the Hjemkomst Center. The Award of Excellence is part of the AASLH Leadership in History Awards, the most prestigious recognition for achievement in the preservation of state and local history.  

Ihdago Manipi: Clay County at 150 explores the drastic period of transformation of the land and its people between the 1850s and 1880s from a tallgrass prairie with tree-lined rivers inhabited by the Dakota, Ojibwe and Métis (Michif) people to a place called Clay County, Minnesota, with regimented, plowed farmland and newly-established towns inhabited by European immigrant families and New England Yankees. The exhibition will be up through December of 2023.  

TWO CASES OF MEASLES CONFIRMED IN MINNESOTA SIBLINGS

The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) is working closely with Hennepin County Public Health and health care providers to investigate two confirmed cases of measles in children who are siblings and live in Hennepin County.

The two children developed symptoms shortly after returning from a visit to a country where measles is common. Both have tested positive for measles. The preschool-aged children were not vaccinated and one was hospitalized due to measles complications. MDH, Hennepin County Public Health staff, hospital and clinic staff are working to notify people who may have been exposed. The risk to the general public from these cases is low. The children were isolated when symptoms started, so exposures were limited to health care and family settings.

MDH has notified health care providers in the state to be alert for patients with signs or symptoms of measles. If additional measles cases develop as a result of these cases, they will likely occur between now and July 1, health officials said.

JOB SERVICE AND NDDOH WEBSITES NOW ACCESSIBLE IN 16 LANGUAGES

BISMARCK, N.D. – As part of a pilot program with North Dakota Information Technology, the websites for both Job Service North Dakota and the North Dakota Department of Health are now accessible in 16 languages. The capability launched in early June at www.jobsnd.com and health.nd.gov.

“This will allow thousands of people easier access to and understanding of our services,” said Pat Bertagnolli, Job Service Executive Director. “We have large populations of New Americans across the state and they’re a vital part of our workforce. Offering easier accessibility to everyone allows us to better serve all North Dakotans and gives us a leg up as far as recruiting.”

“NDDoH is pleased to be part of the website translation pilot,” said Dr. Nizar Wehbi, North Dakota State Health Officer. “The ability for residents who either speak English as a second language or do not speak English to be able to easily access public health information that they understand is an important breakthrough for our website.”

Internet viewers can select their preferred language from a dropdown at the top of any page.  The initial offerings are English, Arabic, Basque, Bosnian, Chinese, French, Hindi, Hmong, Kurdish, Nepali, Pashto, Punjabi, Somali, Spanish, Swahili and Vietnamese. More languages, and other state agency websites are expected to be added.

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